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Blood Jet Poetry Series in New Orleans, weekly poetry and music as well as open mic performances

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Saturday, April 23, 2011

Eileen Myles comes to New Orleans




Eileen Myles will be reading at the 17 Poets! Literary and Performance Series this Thursday, April 28th, 7:30 PM. www.17poets.com






She will be giving a book chat for a small audience above the Gold Mine Saloon on Thursday, April 28 from 6-7. Cost is 20.00 (15.00/ students) and includes a copy of her new book, Inferno (a poet's novel). Space is limited. RSVP to meganaburns@aol.com




More on Eileen's Work:




Eileen Myles was born in Boston and moved to New York in 1974. Her Inferno (a poet's novel) is just out from OR books. For her collection of essays, The Importance of Being Iceland, she received a Warhol/Creative Capital grant. Sorry Tree is her most recent book of poems. In 2010 the Poetry Society of America awarded Eileen the Shelley Prize. She is a Prof. Emeritus of Writing at UC San Diego. She lives in New York.


Inferno (a poet's novel)

Publication November 30th, 2010; 256 pages.

Online purchases from O/R Books only. Also available at fine bookstores.
O/R Website: http://www.eileenmyles.com/inferno.php


Praise for Eileen Myles’ Inferno:


"I was completely stupefied by Inferno in the best of ways. In fact, I think I must feel kind of like Dante felt after seeing the face of God. My descriptive capacity just fails, gives way completely. But I can tell you that Eileen Myles made me understand something I didn’t before. And really, what more can you ask of a novel, or a poet’s novel, or a poem, or a memoir, or whatever the hell this shimmering document is? Just read it." — Alison Bechdel

“What is a poem worth? Not much in America. What is a life worth? Inferno isn’t another ‘life of the poet,’ it’s a fugue state where life and poem are one: shameful and glorious. People sometimes say, ‘I came from nothing,’ but that’s not quite right. Myles shows us a ‘place’ a poet might come from, did come from––working class, Catholic, female, queer. This narrative journey somehow takes place in a moment, every moment, the impossible present moment of poetry.” – Rae Armantrout

“Zingingly funny and melancholy, Inferno follows a young girl from Boston in her descent into the maelstrom of New York Bohemia, circa 1968. Myles beautifully chronicles a lost Eden: ‘The place I found was carved out from sadness and sex and to write a poem there you merely needed to gather.’ ” — John Ashbery

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